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FlexBloggers.org is going 'Bye-Bye'

I have been thinking of doing this for quite a while and have decided that I am taking FlexBloggers.org down.

The site does not generate a whole lot of traffic and occasionally, the script that aggregates entries locks up my server (I have tried to troubleshoot many times, but have never been able to reproduce the issue)

If anyone wishes to take over running the site, I will gladly hand over the code, database and domain name. If not, FlexBloggers.org goes bye-bye in 2 weeks.

Never Forget

This is a repost from 5 years ago on this date.  I will continue to post this every year until I feel it is no longer fitting.

Unless you live under a rock, you are undoubtedly aware that today is the 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th anniversary of the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon.  As I am sitting here working, I am reminded of how I spent that day.

Like most Americans, I first heard news of the first plane that hit the World Trade Center on the news, and then watched in horror as the second plane hit the other tower and ultimately watched both towers fall.  Unlike most Americans, I was unable to watch the events of the day unfold on TV.  I had already made the switch to web development and was working in the IT department of the company where I had spent 12 years (at that time) as a paramedic, including 2 as a manager, but I was still certified as a paramedic and frequently worked extra shifts to pick up some extra cash.

One of the things my company was tasked with was setting up a staging area at a  local airport.  The plan was, as survivors were removed from 'Ground Zero' they would be flown to airports around the area so as not to overwhelm hospitals close to lower Manhattan.  It was decided that I would be in charge of setting up and coordinating this staging area.  I was sent to the airport at about 11:00AM and started preparing for what could have been hundreds of victims.

At the staging area, we coordinated with over 150 people from approximately 50 different police, fire and EMS agencies.  It felt good to be doing something, something we were sure would help.  From the airport in central New Jersey, about 40 miles from Ground Zero, we could see the smoke from the towers.  We did not have a TV and relied on phone calls from others to get information as the day wore on.

As time passed we would get messages that we would be receiving patients soon, yet none ever came.  After 9 hours at the airport, having not treated one person, we were told our services would no longer be needed and we could go home.  It became a stark reality to me that anyone who would survive was already out of the towers.

In the days following 9/11 my company sent numerous crews to offer assistance at Ground Zero. I was on one of these crews at Ground Zero.  While we were not on the pile of rubble trying to find bodies, we were close enough to see the utter devastation that was lower Manhattan. It is a scene that will never be wiped from my mind, but I am not sure I would ever want to.

My whole career as a paramedic I always said that as long as I could walk, I would continue to do the job, even if it was only part time. After 14 years as a paramedic, I let my certification lapse in December of 2003. The events of 9/11 played a huge part in that decision.  It had nothing to do with fear.  It had everything to do with the fact that I knew if something similar happened on my watch, I'd be running in to help people, regardless of the danger, and this would not be fair to my family.  I also knew I could not change who I was, so the only way to ensure I wouldn't do that would be to remove the possibility of it happening, so I left EMS completely.

To this day, when I think of the towers falling, or seeing Ground Zero up close and personal, I get nauseous, I get physically ill.

ColdFusion Developer Week

In case you happen to live under a rock, I wanted to remind everyone that ColdFusion Developer Week starts in a couple of days.

What's that? You don't know what ColdFusion Developer Week is? Well, its a FREE week's worth of ColdFusion training from some of the best ColdFusion peeps around (did you see the list of speakers?)

Well, now you know what it is. So, go register. Now. And I better see you in my session. If not...well....I might cry.

ColdFusion 10 - Loading Dynamic JSON for CFCHART

As I mentioned here, CFCHART allows us point to an external file for the JSON configuration string, however, this file needs to be a plain text file - we cannot point to a ColdFusion file to generate the JSON configuration for us. Thanx to some help from Ray Camden, I figured out a way to 'trick' CFCHART into doing just that. I will admit, it is a bit of a kludge, but it works...and it works nicely.

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ColdFusion 10 - A Few Nice 'Quickies'

I thought I would take a break for talking about charting (but I will get back to it soon) to talk about some more 'small' enhancements to ColdFusion 10 that will make out lives just a tad bit easier.

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Flexbloggers.org is Down..oops

Just wanted to let people know that Flexbloggers.org is currently unavailable. You see, I am in the process of moving my domains off of GoDaddy and over to Hover. Now, when I started the process, I was smart enough to update the DNS records for the domain, however, I was not smart enough to update the Name Server records. Oops....

The name servers have been updated, but as we should all know, it sometimes takes a while for changes like this to propagate across the Internet. Thanks for your patience.

ColdFusion 10 - More Charting Stuff

Here is a cool feature of the new charting in ColdFusion 10. As I have made mention of, the charting engine is using ZingChart 'under the hood' to generate the charts. ZingChart relies on a JSON string for its configuration - everything from what type of chart, to the data contained in a series, to the styling of the chart. When we use CFCHART, ColdFusion generates this JSON string for us. However, there is a way for us to tell ColdFusion what that JSON string should be.

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ColdFusion 10 - Charting Style Defaults

I have become quite enamored with the new charting engine in ColdFusion 10. However, there are some things that I don't love about them - its not that I hate or dislike them, I just think they can be better. One such thing is the default styling of the tooltips.

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ColdFusion 10 - Client Side Charting Demo

One thing I have not played around with in recent versions of ColdFusion was cfchart . I simply have not had a need to do so. During lunch today, I was working on something that I hope to incorporate into one of my cf.Objective() presentations that required me to use the new charting engine in ColdFusion 10.

I do not want to give too much away - just in case it winds up falling flat - but here is a sample graph with which I was working.

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ColdFusion 10 - ColdFusion Administrator Changes

To continue my 'series' of posts about new features that may get over looked, I wanted to point out 2 pretty cool changes to the ColdFusion Administrator.

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